How NOT to Publicize Your Privacy Policy – Spotify.Com

I like the idea of giving users easy access to your privacy policy and terms of use. I wish more sites would not hide their policies. On the other hand when you put the policy in the face of your users (i.e.,when they log in), it should be concise, not written in legalese, and use proper English (or whatever language your site uses). I logged into Spotify.Com, the hot free music streaming service. Immediately the new privacy policy is in the users face.  First line: Spotify Terms and Conditions of Use. OK. Next sentence: Effective as from 14 October 2011. I guess this means effective as of October 14. Next sentence is absolute legalese. 62 words long and four lines of text. The next sentence is eight lines long. I continue reading. The entire agreement takes 26 mouse clicks to read. I defy anyone to read it in less than 15 minutes. My mom is very smart but she would have no idea what the words mean nor would she have the patience to read this. It doesn’t pass the “mom test.”

We privacy professionals have got to do better.

 

 

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About infoguardianangel
The consumer and corporate information guardian angel. Cybersecurity and privacy advice for my clients (and anyone else who cares about protecting their data or their companies).

2 Responses to How NOT to Publicize Your Privacy Policy – Spotify.Com

  1. Mark – you are so right about this. It leads directly into my belief that all of this becomes ‘white noise’; we ignore it, it’s of no use to us – similar to legal terminology in a Lease, or Purchase Agreement for a home – it is what it is and ‘you can’t change it’; our goal in life when the computer boots up is to scroll to the bottom of the page and click “I agree”, and get on with it. Why read the instructions that come with your home wireless . . . the lights are blinking and I’m on the Internet – life is good, right? WEP, WPA – huh?

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